Students continue work on their vision boards from The Power of Purpose Part 1 lesson. Then, they prepare a two-minute presentation of their vision boards.

Objectives

Students will be able to:

  1. Articulate their personal purpose through both a vision board and an oral presentation

Materials

Vision board materials (from Part 1), pen/paper

Exercises

Time Activity Notes
2 min
Introduction

Introduce the lesson by explaining that students will finish their vision boards and present on their personal vision to the class.

If you have students with difficulty presenting or expressing ideas orally, you may want to preview this presentation with them after the first lesson, allowing them time to plan and practice. Otherwise, students at the high school level should be able to create and present a 2-minute speech on their work within one class block.
10 min
Finishing Vision Boards

Provide students with at least 10 minutes to finish their work. Remind them that they will be presenting and that they should be proud of their work. Vision boards should (from Part 1

clearly identify a purpose (may be vague or general, like “build community” or may be specific, like “become a surgeon”); include images, words, and ideas that explain how and why the student wants to pursue this purpose; demonstrate engagement, effort, and positivity in the final product.

8 min
Brainstorming Presentation

Give students at least 8 minutes to silently brainstorm a 2-minute presentation/speech on their purpose.

The speech prompt can simply be, “What is your purpose?”

Level of guidance on this should reflect students’ abilities and fluency with oral presentations.

Differentiation: Some optional ways to support this lesson are to:

  • Provide suggested outlines to students who struggle to present information
  • Model by presenting your own vision board presentation as an example before letting students brainstorm
  • Provide a simple, student-friendly rubric reminding students of the elements of a successful presentation
7 min
Pair Share and Feedback

Give students time to run through their presentations once with a partner and receive feedback. Suggested sharing and feedback practice:

  • 2:00 – Partner 1 gives a speech
  • 0:30 – Partner 1 says 1 thing that went well and 1 thing that needs work
  • 0:30 – Partner 2 provides feedback in the form of 1 positive and 1 place to improve
  • 0:30 – Partner 1 quickly “replays” the part of the speech that needed improvement, incorporating feedback
  • 2:00 – Partner 2 gives a speech
  • 0:30 – Partner 2 says 1 thing that went well and 1 thing that needs work
  • 0:30 – Partner 1 provides feedback in the form of 1 positive and 1 place to improve
  • 0:30 – Partner 2 quickly “replays” the part of the speech that needed improvement, incorporating feedback
The suggested times and activities to the left provide a clear structure for students to practice, get feedback, and incorporate feedback quickly into more practice. This is an effective way for students to get better at presenting quickly, to build confidence in the final presentation, and to build a classroom culture where all students are engaged actively, thoughtful about their partner’s work, and receiving constructive feedback. Presenting guidelines for how to positively frame feedback will help to make this exercise successful and positive for students.
20 min
Presentations

Budget more or less time for presentations, considering the size and needs of your class.

In order to engage the audience in these presentations, students can self-assess or peer-assess, as well as give feedback on positive areas and places to improve for other students.

3 min
Closing

Allow students to wrap up the day’s work by:

  • Encouraging students to give compliments or “shout outs” to other students who displayed courage, creativity, or other positive attributes
  • Having students hang their vision boards in the room
  • Previewing any connected upcoming lessons or activities.

Connections to Other Emotions

If executed in a supportive and positive way, the pair practice and feedback activity, as well as the audience positivity and encouragement, foster the emotions of connected and supported.

Criteria for Success/Formative Assessment

Presentations should:

  • Clearly articulate the student’s unique purpose (may be vague or general, like “build community” or may be specific, like “become a surgeon”)
  • Identify and explain images, words, and visual representations in their Vision Board
  • Demonstrate professionalism and respect during both student’s speech and as an audience member
  • Employ effective posture, volume, tone, and interaction with the audience during the 2-minute speech

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